ProgrammerEnJavaClaudeDelannoypdf

ProgrammerEnJavaClaudeDelannoypdf


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ProgrammerEnJavaClaudeDelannoypdf

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It works fine with Windows XP and 7, however I have an older office machine running Windows 8, which I think the problem is due to. this is the first time this has happened, I have always had windows update applied at the end of the update cycle with no problems. I am also noticing on some of the software being installed is InstallShield 2012, which is creating the issue. Any suggestions?

A:

I’m gonna answer my own question, mainly because I was unable to find the answer anywhere, and I already have a fix. It seems I was originally installing the Release version of VLOOKUP, which is a 32bit vba code module. I changed my setup to VLOOKUP Pro, which is the 64bit version of the same code, and it works fine. Again this is my first time encountering this, so if anyone else has a clue what might be causing this issue, please share it, or provide a link to where this issue was mentioned.

Q:

Using overload resolution with getter-only properties

I have a situation where I know that I have to use overload resolution to achieve a particular effect (return a different type depending on the getter property being called on the property). The only code I can find (though it’s not exactly a duplicate of my problem) is this:
public class OverloadedProperty
{
public int Count { get { return 5; } }
public int Count(int a, int b)
{
return a + b;
}
}

which would normally cause an ambiguity given that int and int are both assignable to the Count property. However, as per the linked article, an explicit cast is required to get an unambiguous call:
Object obj = new OverloadedProperty();
var count = obj.Count;
var sum = (int)obj.Count(5, -2);

My question is, assuming that I have a valid reason to want to do this (for example, I’m writing the code in C#, and I’m holding a reference to the property, which would otherwise be a DynamicObject, in the
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